Blisters under tongue


There are many different types of blisters that can occur under the tongue of a person. The most common types of them are canker sores and colds sores that are caused by the herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1). Other rarer forms of blisters under tongue are caused by tuberculosis, syphilis, Vincent's disease, Behcet's syndrome, leukemia, anemia, or drug allergies.

Types of blisters under tongue

Canker sores or blisters are tiny, crater-like lesions inside of the mouth that can appear on or under the tongue or inside the cheeks, alone or in a group. Minor canker sores or blisters affect about 20 percent of the population at any given time. The blister is generally small and oval with a gray center and a surrounding red, inflamed halo. Cankers have not been yet proven to have a viral origin and they are not contagious, or a sign of any other disease. They are very painful and irritating, but they do not tend to go away by themselves in about a week. It is still not verified by the scientists that what causes canker sores or blisters to appear. They seem more to be stress-related for some people, but stress can also be a side effect for the blisters. Heredity may play a vital role, and some women find that they recur at the same time each month during their menstrual cycle. Some people claims that food allergies instigate the blisters, and others blame a lack of Vitamin C in the diet.

More of the types

One last suspect is in the case of trauma, the kind that comes from biting your tongue or the inside of your cheek. What we do know about this is that there are over-the-counter topical medications that may ease the pain and hasten healing, but canker sores also will dissipate on their own with time. If blisters persist more than two weeks, one should go to the health care provider. Cold sores or blisters caused by HSV-1 are different than canker sores or blisters in that they are very, very contagious. HSV-1 is the virus is the one that affects the mouth and facial areas, although it can be transmitted to the genital area through oral-genital sex. The virus can also be transmitted through the direct contact with a lesion, also through the contact with a fluid from a lesion, and through contact with the virus even when no symptoms are present in the infected person.

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Friction blisters
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Herpes blister
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Blisters
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