Throat blister


A throat blister is a disease, which is primarily located in the area around the tonsils. Both a virus and bacteria can be the cause of it. A throat blister is partly a disease in itself and partly an effect of other diseases such as flu and glandular fever. The disease is normally seen in children and young people but it can occur at any age. The characteristics of the disease are throat pain and trouble swallowing. If the disease is due to bacteria it can be treated with antibiotics. Usually there are no complications. By being infected by a virus or bacteria. Infection by a virus may come from the same virus that causes colds and from an Epstein-Barr virus - the latter causes glandular fever. The infection originates from airborne droplets and hands that carry the infection from person to person. Among the bacteria that cause sore throats, the streptococcus group A is the most common. The incubation period between picking up the infection until the disease breaks out is two to four days or sometimes less.

Signs of a throat blister

There are many symptoms, which show a throat blister. They may be, pain in the throat and difficulty in swallowing, or pain may spread to the ears. The throat turns reddish. The tonsils are swollen and may be coated. There can be possibly a high temperature. Swollen lymph nodes under your jaw and in your neck may occur. If the sore throat is due to a viral infection the symptoms are usually milder. Usually they are connected to the common cold. If the sore throat is due to the Coxsackie virus, small blisters may develop on the tonsils and in the soft palate. The blisters erupt in a few days and are followed by a scab, which may be very painful. If the sore throat is due to a streptococcal infection, the tonsils often swell and become coated and the throat is sore. The patient runs a temperature, has sour breath and may feel quite ill.

Trouble during a throat blister

Usually a throat blister causes no trouble and only lasts about a week, but the following complications may arise, namely, a secondary infection may occur in the middle ear or sinuses. If the sore throat is due to a streptococcus infection, there may be a rash. An uncommon complication is a throat abscess that usually occurs only on one side. In very rare cases, diseases like rheumatic fever or a particular kidney disease may occur.

Blister prevention
Blisters are quite common for anyone who regularly participates in sports. Most athletes just accept them as the price you pay to play, but there are measures to avoid them, or decrease the pain and risk of infection if you find you have one. ...

Genital blisters
Genital blisters are caused by the herpes simplex virus II (HSV-II). It is estimated that 1 million new cases occur each year in the U.S alone. The infection is transmitted during sexual intercourse or by other intimate contact with the genitals,...

Itchy blisters
Itching around a blister can be a sign that the blister is healing. Other possible causes of itchy blisters include a viral illness, such as chickenpox or shingles. Red bumps may turn into blisters that become cloudy, break, and scab over. Contact...

Blisters
© Blisters.Tdrbizl.Com 2006